Archive for March 10th, 2009

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Ukraine and Electrical Appliances

March 10, 2009

Just a quick blog regarding Ukraine and electrical appliances you may bring from home.

Ukraine works on a 220V point of delivery electrical system………unless the building has pre WWI wiring in which case it is 210V………..but I have never found a building which has not been updated!

It uses 2 pin sockets, rather than the 3 pin sockets found in the UK, so 2 pin adaptors are essential if you are a Brit.

Everything works fine on running from the Ukrainian system.  Your computer, laptop, toaster………everything!!!

Nuff said.

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Retirement & Residency

March 10, 2009

For those wanting to relocate on a permanent basis to Odessa, the official reasoning behind permission is listed below.  There is no other way to qualify for Permanent Residency than those stated.  I will comment on a few of the categories stated to clear up some misinterpretations:

An immigration permit is granted within the immigration quota.
The immigration quota is determined by the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine for each category of immigrants:
1) scientists and cultural workers whose immigration corresponds to the Ukrainian interests;
2) highly experienced and skilled workers and specialists who are in acute lack for the Ukrainian economy;
3) persons who invested into the Ukrainian economy not less than 100 000 USD and registered their investment;
4) persons who are direct brother or sister, grandfather or grandmother, grandson or granddaughter of Ukrainian citizens;
5) persons who were citizens of Ukraine in the past;
6) an immigrant’s parents, husband or wife and his/her infant children;
7) refugees who have been living permanently in Ukraine for more than 3 years upon the date of obtaining of the status of refugee, and also their parents, husband or wife and his/her infant children who live with them.

An immigration permit may be granted out of the quota:
1) to one of the spouse if he/she is married to a citizen of Ukraine for more than 2 years; to children or parents of citizens of Ukraine; 
2) to persons who are guardians or trustees of citizens of Ukraine or are under guardianship or trusteeship of Ukrainian citizens;
3) to persons who has a right on acquisition of citizenship of Ukraine based on territorial origin;
4) to persons whose immigration is in the interests of Ukraine;
5) to foreigners or stateless citizens who have Ukrainian origin or Ukrainian ethnic origin.

Ok – comments:

1) scientists and cultural workers whose immigration corresponds to the Ukrainian interests;
2) highly experienced and skilled workers and specialists who are in acute lack for the Ukrainian economy;

Ukraine’s requirements in these fields are never broadcasted……..if they even exist.  Ukraine’s population, certainly over the past few decades, is well educated.  You chances of qualification under this section is slim unless you have been specifically invited by Ukraine.

 

3) persons who invested into the Ukrainian economy not less than 100 000 USD and registered their investment;

The most commonly misunderstood.  This does not mean spending $100,000 on a house and putting your money into the economy.  It does not mean having this money in a Ukrainian Bank Account.  Quite simply, what this means, is, quite simply, you pay the Ukrainian Government $100,000 for your Permanent Residency and nothing more.  It is of course non-refundable should you want to give up this status in the future.

 

7) refugees who have been living permanently in Ukraine for more than 3 years upon the date of obtaining of the status of refugee, and also their parents, husband or wife and his/her infant children who live with them.

With the myriad or laws from entry, registration and work et al, many of which are contradictory and enforced in an inconsistent manner, the chances of remaining in Ukraine for the requisite 3 years and not falling foul of one or a number of these laws……….and thus deported, holds a similar chance to winning a national lottery.   Nuff said!!

 

1) to one of the spouse if he/she is married to a citizen of Ukraine for more than 2 years; to children or parents of citizens of Ukraine; 

A good example of where interpretation, conflicting laws and enforcement are at odds with each other.  The Family Code of Ukraine states, that upon marriage to a Ukrainian citizen, the non-national has immediate leave to remain until qualifying for Permanent Residency after 2 years of marriage.  According to the Immigration law, as seen above, the married partner is only allowed to remain permanently after a period of 2 years of marriage……thus making them liable to the 90/180 day rule (explained in a different post) or for the periods valid in an visa requirements for work in Ukraine.  The only consistency in the enforcement of these laws…….is the inconsistency.

The interpretations of the laws change frequently, not as often as I change my underwear but certainly on a par with a change of hairstyle……or even haircut!  Any current interpretations are passed only to the enforcement authorities (OVIR and Customs/Boarder Control) and not to lawyers.  It may well be, therefore, that should you wish to challenge an interpretation, the lawyer is fighting it with 6 or 12 month old information.

Therefore, if you intend to retire to Odessa, and remain here on a permanent basis, then you have in effect very few options to remain within the law.  If you can afford to pay Ukraine $100,000 (per person) then this is the quickest method to ensure your status.  If you marry a Ukrainian national, you are entitled to permanent residency upon 2 years of marriage (according to Immigration Law……..and not the Family Code which contradicts this, stating you are entitled to leave to remain until you reach 2 years of marriage).  If you are a benevolent soul, you can adopt or become a legal guardian of a Ukrainian child (under 18 years) and obtain Permanent Residency immediately that way.  (Unfortunately there are many orphanages with many children).

Apart from these methods, as a retiree, there is, at present, no other method to obtain permanent residency here, leaving you subject to “boarder hoping” or a maximum of 6 months in Ukraine.

Obviously, as and when things change……..all too frequently, I will attempt to keep you all “up to speed”.

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