Archive for November 3rd, 2017

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Journalism courses to include spin, manipulation and boilerplate?

November 3, 2017

From within the bunker of the Ministry of Information, on 2nd November an announcement was made regarding the decision to include “Communication Science” within the specialisms available for those studying journalism in Ukraine.

The cynical reader will perhaps consider this a specialism relating to media spin, manipulation and boilerplate statements – regardless of whether they are to be employed by those in government or by entities owned by the oligarchy, or representing the oligarchy directly, or other (in)famous personalities.

After all, part of an a-typical job description for a “communications specialist” would include how to manage, deflect or ignore incoming media requests, and also control what reaches the media, how, and the framing of it.

(Perhaps in the current moment, an educational module and/or professional update is being crafted somewhere about how to keep the employer/client/politician off of twitter and Facebook to avoid the scuppering of best laid plans?  Good luck with that.  There is as much chance of keeping a Ukrainian politician from metaphorically putting their foot in their mouth on Facebook as there is of preventing President Trump of doing the same on twitter.)

The wily blog reader of course recognises the oratory and prose emitted from the bowels of a “communication specialist” in a split second – not only for what is said and how, but more often than not, for that which is not said.

The equally wily communication specialist will know that it is not what you say, but what people hear that matters.

However, a less cynical reader may consider “communication specialists” a necessary tool for Ukraine to both defend its information space and also assist in nation building.  Ergo there will certainly be support from parts of civil society for the creation of this education specialty too.

Much perhaps depends upon a particular communication specialist and their employer as to the accuracy and integrity of any media interaction.

A reader may perhaps also ponder whether this profession should be part of journalism, or part of political science, or part of business management degrees – or perhaps all three – if the Ukrainian leadership have embarked upon a policy of creating “communication specialists” by introducing “communication science” as an education specialism to produce such a domestic, professionally certificated resource.

However, this is not a top-down policy decision to create professionals versed in the delivery of flapdoodle and misinformation on behalf of political and business leaders – though they will ultimately benefit.

The Ministry of Information is actually responding to bottom-up requests by the student body.  Ukrainian academia from journalism and political science appears to robustly back the student body.  In short it is a case of the government being responsive to the constituency (despite the obvious gains to the government over time).  Both Ministry of Information and Ministry of Education & Science are supportive.

Thus it now remains for a Cabinet of Ministers Decree to create and recognise the specialist subject of “Communications Science”.  Decisions have to be made into which fields of university study this specialism should be introduced, and from when.  Simply journalism, or journalism and other(s)?

h1

Journalism courses to include spin, manipulation and boilerplate?

November 3, 2017

From within the bunker of the Ministry of Information, on 2nd November an announcement was made regarding the decision to include “Communication Science” within the specialisms available for those studying journalism in Ukraine.

The cynical reader will perhaps consider this a specialism relating to media spin, manipulation and boilerplate statements – regardless of whether they are to be employed by those in government or by entities owned by the oligarchy, or representing the oligarchy directly, or other (in)famous personalities.

After all, part of an a-typical job description for a “communications specialist” would include how to manage, deflect or ignore incoming media requests, and also control what reaches the media, how, and the framing of it.

(Perhaps in the current moment, an educational module and/or professional update is being crafted somewhere about how to keep the employer/client/politician off of twitter and Facebook to avoid the scuppering of best laid plans?  Good luck with that.  There is as much chance of keeping a Ukrainian politician from metaphorically putting their foot in their mouth on Facebook as there is of preventing President Trump of doing the same on twitter.)

The wily blog reader of course recognises the oratory and prose emitted from the bowels of a “communication specialist” in a split second – not only for what is said and how, but more often than not, for that which is not said.

The equally wily communication specialist will know that it is not what you say, but what people hear that matters.

However, a less cynical reader may consider “communication specialists” a necessary tool for Ukraine to both defend its information space and also assist in nation building.  Ergo there will certainly be support from parts of civil society for the creation of this education specialty too.

Much perhaps depends upon a particular communication specialist and their employer as to the accuracy and integrity of any media interaction.

A reader may perhaps also ponder whether this profession should be part of journalism, or part of political science, or part of business management degrees – or perhaps all three – if the Ukrainian leadership have embarked upon a policy of creating “communication specialists” by introducing “communication science” as an education specialism to produce such a domestic, professionally certificated resource.

However, this is not a top-down policy decision to create professionals versed in the delivery of flapdoodle and misinformation on behalf of political and business leaders – though they will ultimately benefit.

The Ministry of Information is actually responding to bottom-up requests by the student body.  Ukrainian academia from journalism and political science appears to robustly back the student body.  In short it is a case of the government being responsive to the constituency (despite the obvious gains to the government over time).  Both Ministry of Information and Ministry of Education & Science are supportive.

Thus it now remains for a Cabinet of Ministers Decree to create and recognise the specialist subject of “Communications Science”.  Decisions have to be made into which fields of university study this specialism should be introduced, and from when.  Simply journalism, or journalism and other(s)?

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